6.0 LS Engine Build With Parts From Summit Racing (2022)

JEREMY RICE

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New Age Power

6.0 LS Engine Build With Parts From Summit Racing

By now I’m sure you’ve heard of the Chevrolet LS engine. If not, I’m glad you’ve finally found a way to get out from under that rock. The LS-based engine platform has definitely taken over as the go-to engine swap in the last 5-10 years, and its popularity is still on the rise. Different variations of the engine can be found in everything from a bare-bones work truck all the way up to a factory-supercharged Corvette. Due to the different vehicle applications in which GM put these engines from the factory, obtaining an LS engine for your swap is easy. Just skim your local classifieds, or make a trip to the salvage yard, and you’ll probably have a dozen or so to choose from on any given day. But what if you’re skeptical about buying a used engine?

Purchasing a used, or “pull out” engine, does come with some risks, and you should definitely consider them before purchasing. Since most of the odometers in newer vehicles are digital, you can’t simply glance into a vehicle to see how many miles are on it. Even if the seller knows the mileage, you still just have to trust his word. Compression tests can be done, and salvage yards will usually give you some kind of guarantee, but what if you want more piece of mind? Good news, there are options for brand-new LS-based engines.

When the opportunity to build a new LS engine presented itself to us, we knew right where to look for all of the parts we’d need. Summit Racing was our first and only phone call. Summit has been around since 1968 and is continuing to grow every year. In fact, it just completed the construction of its fourth distribution site located in Arlington, Texas. It also carries products from more than 1,500 manufacturers, so we were positive the company would be able to get us everything we needed to complete our engine build.

We discussed our options with a Summit rep and came up with a plan to build a strong and reliable engine that would also make great horsepower. We decided to go with a short-block from BluePrint Engines. We also opted for a complete top-end engine kit from Trick Flow to complete most of the build. However, there are a lot of smaller parts we still needed to complete the engine assembly and get it ready to drop into our project. Follow along and we’ll tell you all about it.

SOURCES

• Summit Racing
800.230.3030
Summitracing.com
• Trick Flow Specialties
888.841.6556
Trickflow.com
• Royal Purple
888.382.6300
Royalpurple.com

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Here’s how the new BluePrint Engines 6.0L, 364-ci short-block engine (P/N MLL-BPLS3640) showed up after we ordered it from Summit Racing

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Our first order of business was to get the engine unpacked and on an engine stand so we could inspect it and make sure all was well.

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Once we received the Trick Flow top-end kit (P/N TFS-K306-550-470), we laid it out on a table and took a quick inventory. The kit comes complete with new, assembled heads. The heads boast a ton of changes from the stock versions to provide extra strength and power. The kit also comes with a new camshaft featuring an advertised 291/295 duration, .595/.595 lift and 112 degrees of lobe separation. The camshaft is designed for use with the pushrods and roller rockers, which are also included with the kit. New head gaskets and head bolts round out the list of included parts.

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There are a lot of parts necessary to complete the engine build, and Summit helped us put together a list of everything we needed. Once everything arrived, we laid it out and took inventory. We picked up everything from new ignition coils to front and rear covers, matching valve covers and an intake manifold.

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Once everything was accounted for, we began the assembly process with help from our friend, Jason. Starting with the new lifters from Trick Flow (P/N TFS-21400002-16), we forced some Royal Purple HPS oil into the lifters and let them soak for a while.

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While the lifters were taking a bath, we installed the camshaft. We applied some Royal Purple Max Tuff assembly lube to the camshaft and carefully slid it into place. It became more difficult to hang on to the camshaft once it got further into the engine, so we threaded a bolt into the end of it to help with the installation.

(Video) Summit Racing's Project 1000: A 1,000 Horsepower 6.0L LS Engine Build (Part 1, the Introduction)

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With the camshaft fully inserted into the engine, the retaining plate (P/N NAL-12589016) and new bolts (P/N NAL-11561455) were installed and torqued to spec.

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Installing the timing set is a very critical procedure that must be done with precision. After setting the engine at Top Dead Center (TDC) with compression stroke at cylinder 1, we installed the crank sprocket and hub sprocket.

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Next, we installed the cam sprocket and chain. Notice the “0” on the crank sprocket is straight up, and the dot on the cam sprocket is straight down. These indicators need to be aimed directly at each other, just like in the photo, for the timing to be correct.

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Next, we installed the oil pump. Jason prefilled the pump with some more Royal Purple oil so that it wouldn’t be dry on initial start up.

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The oil pump (P/N NAL-12612289) was installed over the crank/hub sprocket.

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With everything on the front of the engine torqued to spec, the front cover/timing cover (P/N NAL-12561243) was installed to finish the front part of the engine assembly.

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Once the lifters had soaked up all of the oil they could, it was their turn to be installed. The lifters are installed four at a time into the four lifter guides (P/N NAL-12595365), and then they’re dropped into the engine.

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New hardware from Summit was used to secure the lifter trays to the engine. The lifter guide retaining bolts (P/N NAL-12551163) were installed and the lifters were put in place.

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Next, the new Trick Flow heads were added, but first Jason gave the mating surface a good cleaning in order to ensure a perfect seal with the new head gaskets.

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Since the engine assembly from BluePrint didn’t come with dowel pins, we made sure to order some. The new cylinder head pins (P/N NAL-12570326) were tapped into place with a brass hammer and will position the heads correctly.

(Video) Summit Racing’s Project 1000: A 1,000 Horsepower 6.0L LS Engine Build (Part 2, Top End & Dyno Run)

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Then Jason installed the new head gaskets provided with the top-end kit.

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With the short-block fully cleaned and prepped, the new Trick Flow cylinder heads were set in place. The cylinder heads were located on the engine block with the previously installed positioning pins.

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Tightening the cylinder heads is a five-step process, using the supplied torque-to-yield bolts. The first step is to install all of the M11 bolts and torque to 22 ft-lbs. Second, those 10 bolts all need to be turned 90 degrees. Third, all of the same bolts, with the exception of the two outer bolts within the cylinder head, are turned an additional 90 degrees. Fourth, the two unaddressed M11 bolts are turned an additional 50 degrees. Lastly, the M8 bolts supplied are tightened to 22 ft-lbs.

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A simple way to determine how much the bolts have been turned is by marking the bolt heads with a Sharpie. Trick Flow provides a very detailed set of instructions that also lay out the order in which the head bolts should be tightened.

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After installing the heads, the new valley cover (P/N NAL-12568002) was installed. The new cover comes just like you see it, with the gasket and hardware already in place.

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The new cover is set in place and the hardware is torqued down.

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Several sensors are needed throughout the engine for it to run correctly. We installed the new knock sensors (P/N ADO-213-3521) first. These threaded into the top of the engine block, after the valley cover was installed.

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We also picked up a knock sensor harness (P/N NAL-12601822) to plug into the new sensors. The harness has rubber seals built into it that prevent water from gathering around the sensors.

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We turned our attention back to completing the installation of the heads. A new set of pushrods was included in the kit from Trick Flow. Obviously, Trick Flow did all of the work to ensure the pushrods were the correct length for the kit.

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The heat-treated and hardened chrome-moly pushrods were installed in the cylinder heads in preparation for the new roller rockers.

(Video) I SPENT $3500 ON MY 6.0L LS ENGINE BUILD!!

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Speaking of rockers, those were next on the list to install. The Trick Flow rockers are made from billet aluminum, which is stronger and lighter than a factory steel rocker. Plus, the roller creates less friction with the pushrod connection.

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Jason made sure to torque down the pedestal mounting bolt. We will revisit the bolt after a break-in period.

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A couple more sensors needed to be installed before we went any further. The new camshaft position sensor (P/N ADO-213-363) is located at the rear of the engine valley. This sensor simply drops in and is secured using a single bolt. The sensor reads the position of the camshaft while the engine is running via a machined groove on the camshaft.

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Another necessary sensor is a crankshaft position sensor. This particular part (P/N ADO-213-354) is meant for the 24X electronics system. The color of the sensor will indicate whether you have a 24X or 58X. That’s a whole other topic though; this is the one we needed for our application.

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Since the engine was on a stand, we were able to spin the entire thing upside down. This makes it much easier to clean the oil pan mating surface in preparation for installation.

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Summit sells these Chevrolet Performance muscle car oil pan kits (P/N NAL-19212593), which should work perfectly in most applications. The kit comes complete with the oil pickup tube and gasket. We installed the oil pump pickup tube first, followed by the oil pan. We also added
a Royal Purple oil filter to keep our oil nice
and clean.

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Summit recently released its own intake manifold (P/N SUM-226122B), so we ordered one for our engine. This manifold is fabricated from aluminum and features a 92mm throttle bore. We ordered ours with a black powder-coated finish.

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Before securing it in place, we realized that there were some ports in the bottom of the manifold that needed our attention. Since there wasn’t a provision for the MAP sensor, we used one of the ports. Then we plugged two of the other ports and threaded a hose barb fitting into the last remaining hole, but you’ll have to wait until later to see what that’s for.

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With the intake manifold prepped with the provided O-ring seals, we bolted it in place using the provided hardware

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A Holley throttle body controls the air entering the intake manifold. Holley’s Sniper throttle body (P/N SNE-860004) works perfectly with the intake manifold because it has a matching 92mm bore, four-bolt pattern, and it’s available with black anodizing.

(Video) Pro LS Rotating Assembly (Summit Racing Equipment)

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We also ordered a set of Holley aluminum valve covers (P/N HLY-241-112). These valve covers are the tall version. Although the Trick Flow rockers should fit under the stock height valve covers, we had nothing to lose by ordering the taller versions. The black powder coat on these is nearly identical to the Summit intake manifold, so they match perfectly.

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The intake manifold comes with mounting locations for the fuel rails as well. We ordered the Summit fuel rail kit (P/N SUM-227150), which came with everything we needed to get the fuel rails in place, including these mounts. After the mounting tabs were loosely in place, we inserted a set of fuel injectors into the fuel rails and aligned them with the machined ports in the intake manifold.

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Using a bit of lube on the O-ring seals of the injectors, we put the assembly in place and used the provided hardware to secure the rail.

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These Hedman Hustler headers (P/N HED-45666) are a mid-length design, featuring 1 ¾-inch primaries and a 3-inch collector. We opted for the silver ceramic coating, which should help keep engine compartment temperatures lower.

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Installing the headers while the engine was on the stand was about as easy as it gets. We used the supplied gaskets and hardware and installed them loosely. Most likely we will have to install the engine into our project with the headers removed.

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Once the headers were installed, we added the new coil packs (P/N SUM-850504-8) and spark plug wires (P/N SUM-867828). We did have to pick up our own hardware for the coils, but some stainless Allen-head bolts and washers were readily available at our local hardware store.

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There are a few things going on in this photo. First, remember the barbed fittings we installed under the intake manifold? One was for the MAP sensor and we simply slid a short piece of vacuum hose onto that and the MAP sensor (P/N NAL-12592525). The second pertinent item is the steam vent line kit from Trick Flow (P/N TFS-306SB601). This kit comes with the fittings and lines needed to plumb the steam vent lines. The last thing you’ll notice is that we still need to put some hardware in the cam position sensor.

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To finish this portion of the build we installed the final two sensors, which go on the side of the Holley throttle body. The first is for the top; it’s the IAC or Idle Air Control Motor (P/N HLY-543-105). The bottom one is the TPS or Throttle Position Sensor (P/N SNE-870001). Both are Holley parts, so they fit perfectly into the throttle body. Again, we had to provide our own hardware, but it was easy to get from our local hardware store.

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This is the completed engine. You are seeing some extra parts on the front, and that was intentional. Stay tuned for our next tech article where we’ll explain all about that supercharger setup.

FAQs

How much HP can you get out of a 6.0 LS? ›

If we were to run the 6.0L in stock trim, the resulting power output would be around 400 hp (on this dyno the way we test).

How much HP can a 6.0 Vortec handle? ›

They can handle about 800 hp and 7,000 rpm in boosted applications (at least for a while). They are likely to bend before they break when subjected to real track conditions. If you're getting forged pistons, upgrade to forged connecting rods at the same time.

How much hp does a cammed 6.0 make? ›

What we wound up with was a near-stock 6.0L truck motor that produced peak numbers of 443 hp at 5,400 rpm and 467 lb-ft of torque at 4,500 rpm.

How big can you make a 6.0 LS? ›

The 6.0L block—used in the LQ4, LQ9, and LY6—is the most popular with hot rodders. It features a 4.000-inch bore and can be purchased brand new for $800. It can safely accommodate a 4.030-inch bore and is good for 421 ci when matched with a 4.125-inch stroke.

What's the difference between LS and Vortec? ›

Engines with the LS designation were typically set up for passenger car duty while the Vortec line was for GM's SUV and truck lines. In other words, the difference is in the marketing and where the various engines were going to be used across the GM brands.

What LS is best for boost? ›

If you're planning on boosting your project the 4.8L truck engine will be perfect for you. The 4.8L can take insane amounts of boost completely stock and will really perform well. If you don't want a barebones 5.3L or 4.8L you could always step up to a 6.2L truck block which is based on the LS3 engine.

How much boost can a stock LS handle? ›

on a stock ls1/ls2. These boost numbers can be plenty safe so long as the car has the proper tune. that PSI *can* be safe detonation wise (with a really good tune!)...but common evidence suggests that 500-550rwhp is about the limit of stock internals, mainly the pistons and con rods begin to start dying over 550rwhp.

Which motor is better LQ4 or LQ9? ›

The ONLY difference between an LQ4 and LQ9 is the piston!

The LQ4 piston is dished where as the LQ9 is a flat-top increasing compression to 10:1, and HP to 345 factory. The LQ9 is a limited production engine and VERY desirable as it is the HO 6.0L and comes with a premium price.

How much horsepower can a stock LQ4 handle? ›

The LQ4 and LQ9 have very strong blocks. They can handle over 1,000 hp.

How can you tell the difference between LQ4 and LQ9? ›

The only differences were:
  • The LQ4 came with dished pistons.
  • The LQ9 came with flat top pistons. (This raised the compression ratio, horsepower, and torque.)
  • The LQ9 had injectors with a slightly higher flow rating.
1 Jun 2017

How much HP does a cam add? ›

You can expect a gain of about 10% from a performance camshaft. If your car puts out 150 bhp, this could rise to around 165 bhp. For the best results and a much more significant increase, a performance camshaft installation should be accompanied by many other modifications and finalized with Stage 1 and Stage 2 tuning.

Which GM LS engine is best? ›

LS7: Best.

LS Engine. Ever. In a world with 650hp Camaro ZL1s, along with even more powerful Hellcats and Shelby Mustangs, it's easy to forget the influence and importance of the LS7-powered Corvette Z06.

Is the LQ9 a LS motor? ›

The LQ9 is a 6.0L Gen. 3 small block engine used in GM trucks between 2002 and 2007. For marketing purposes, it was also known as the Vortec HO 6000 or VortecMAX. The information listed here is for the stock engine.
...
LQ9 Performance Specifications.
Engine Ratings
Horsepower Rating345 hp
Torque Rating380 ft./lbs.
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2 Feb 2018

How much HP does a Stage 2 cam add? ›

How much HP does a Stage 2 camshaft add? Stage 2 is upgrading the camshaft while also upgrading the intake and remapping the ECU and exhaust system in order to complete Stage 1. What is this? You can see 20-25% more power from the engine when you've completed stages 1 and 2.

What heads came on 6.0 LS? ›

LQ4. These heads came on low-performance 6.0-liter truck engines in two variations: “873” cast iron (1999–2000) and “317” aluminum (2001+). The early design was the only castiron LS head ever made, and the least desirable in a performance application.

Is an LQ4 an LS motor? ›

The LQ4 is a 6.0L LS (Gen. 3) small block engine used in GM trucks between 1999 and 2007. For marketing purposes, it was also known as the Vortec 6000.

What is the strongest LS block? ›

Billy sums it up by claiming, “Our BMP LS aluminum block has proven itself to be the strongest of the cast-aluminum blocks available, mainly due to the water jacket area which gives the cylinder walls the strength they need in order not to balloon under extreme cylinder pressures.

How much power does a LS 408 stroker make? ›

Equipped with the stock 5.3L truck cam, the 408 stroker produced 449 hp at 5,100 rpm and 522 lb-ft of torque at 3,900 rpm.

How big can you bore and stroke a 6.0 LS? ›

LS Engine Bore & Stroke Chart
Engine SizeBoreStroke
5.3L (325 c.i.d.)3.780 in.3.622 in.
5.7L (346 c.i.d.)3.898 in.3.622 in.
6.0L (364 c.i.d.)4.000 in.3.622 in.
6.2L (376 c.i.d.)4.065 in.3.622 in.
2 more rows
5 Jan 2018

What does LS stand for? ›

LS stands for “luxury sport” and is what is featured in the names of most of the base models in the Chevy lineup.

Is the Vortec 6.0 a good engine? ›

Overall, the 6.0 vortec is an extremely dependable and reliable motor. These engines frequently last beyond 300,000 miles with minimal issues beyond regular maintenance. However, making it to 300,000 miles will likely require some non-engine repairs and maintenance, such as suspension components.

What year did the 6.0 LS come out? ›

Overview. The 6.0L LS2 engine debuted in the 2005 Chevrolet Corvette C6, and was also immediately placed into several other General Motors products for the 2005 model year.

Which LS engines are all aluminum? ›

With the noted exception of the early LQ4 engine, all LS engines have aluminum cylinder heads. The LS2 and L76 are noteworthy in that they are both Gen IV 6.0L aluminum block engines, and that they came from the factory in both cars and trucks.

Which LS motor makes the most horsepower? ›

Chevrolet Performance - Quite simply the most powerful LS crate engine ever from Chevrolet Performance: The 770 HP LSX454R!

What LS engine has 317 heads? ›

LQ4 engines received the Generation III 317 V8 head in 2001. It has cathedral shaped intake ports and D shaped exhaust. Its large combustion chamber results in lower compression ratios.

Can you turbo a stock LS? ›

Yes, you can make big power by throwing boost at a stock LS engine, however, if you want the horsepower party to last for a long time you'll need to make some changes to the engine. The stock components just can't deal with the stress that forced induction can put on them when you really start to crank up the boost.

How much horsepower can an aluminum block handle? ›

And although iron blocks can handle more power, well-built modern aluminum blocks can be pretty stout as well. So much of it comes down to the tune; some guys will break blocks at 1,800 horsepower, while others make 3,500 horsepower and have 700 passes on a block.

How much HP can an aluminum LS block handle? ›

Concept Performance's New Aluminum LSR Block Can Take 1,500+ HP.

Is a LQ4 an LS2? ›

Yes an no they are the same bore and stroke but have some difference. Namely the pistons and compression ratio. The LQ4 has dished pistons and runs lower CR.

Is the LQ4 an iron block? ›

Starting with an iron block LQ4 plucked from nothing more exotic than a Chevy Suburban, the engine featured here was built to compete in our annual AMSOIL Engine Masters Challenge engine-building competition.

What vehicles did the LQ4 come in? ›

LQ4
Year(s)ModelPower
1999–2006Chevrolet Silverado 1500HD/2500HD/3500HD Denali300 hp (224 kW) @ 4400 rpm
2000–2001GMC Sierra C3325 hp (242 kW) @ 5200 rpm

What's the difference between LQ9 and LS2? ›

The LQ9 is a GEN III based engine, easily interchangable with LS1 cars and still interchangeable with LS2's with a few tweeks. LS2's have a different reluctor, and the cam sensor is on the timing cover.

How much boost can an engine take? ›

If you have a stock engine, with a compressor that is factory set to produce no more than twenty pounds of boost, you shouldn't modify the system to make it produce much more than 25 pounds of boost. And increase of 5 pounds over stock is probably the limit you should go by.

How much does a LQ9 engine weight? ›

The Weight Of 48 LS & LT-Based Engines
NameFully Dressed Weight (lbs)Short block (lbs)
LQ9520216
LM4520175
LS2 (automatic)442.6106
LS2 (manual)482.2106
44 more rows
6 Sept 2021

Is the L96 aluminum? ›

The L96 engine is a 6.0L Gen.
...
L96 Rotating Assembly.
L96 Rotating Assembly Specs
Piston MaterialHypereutectic Cast Aluminum Alloy
Piston StyleDished with valve reliefs
Piston Volume+6.7cc
12 more rows
9 Aug 2018

What is a L76 engine? ›

The L76—like its LS2 sibling—is a 6.0L, Gen. 4, aluminum small block engine that was used both in GM cars and trucks. The L76 is an adapted version of the LS2, featuring new rectangle port cylinder heads and Active Fuel Management (AFM). The L76 was available in the Pontiac G8 GT from 2007-09.

What LS motor is in a 2003 Silverado? ›

Chevy LS Engines
ModelYear(s)Engine RPO
Silverado 15001999-075.3L Vortec LM7
Silverado 1500 HD2001-076.0L Vortec LQ4
Silverado 15002002-075.3L Vortec L59
Silverado SS2003-076.0L Vortec LQ9
73 more rows
21 Sept 2017

Do headers increase hp? ›

In general, a quality set of headers should provide an increase of approximately 10-20 horsepower, and if you're restrained with your right foot, you may even see an increase in fuel mileage.

How much hp do headers add? ›

So how much hp do long tube headers add? If attached to a stock engine, you can expect about 6-9 hp over a manifold.

What is a Stage 3 cam? ›

The Stage 3 LS1 camshaft is the largest camshaft that we recommend with the stock torque converter. This Cam Motion hydraulic roller cam delivers mild performance idle, excellent low end torque, and extended RPM capabilities over the stock camshaft.

Which LS engine is most popular? ›

The L92, in our opinion, is the most popular engine in this category because of its Gen IV design and 6.2-liters of displacement. The LS3 L99 6.2-liter powerplants were available in the 2010-2015 Camaro SS.

What is so special about LS engines? ›

The main reason that they're such a compact V8 engine is because of their “old-school” pushrod design, as well as all of the modern designs they used when designing the engine block. The push-rod design that they continue to use is unlike almost all modern engines that have overhead cams.

How much does it cost to build an LS engine? ›

For a typical LS crate engine you can easily spend $7,000 and you'll need to drop another $1,200 for the computer and harness to make it run. It all adds up to some serious coin, but if you have the cash it's certainly the way to go.

How much HP can a stock 6.0 LS handle? ›

This formula works regardless of the original power output. If we were to run the 6.0L in stock trim, the resulting power output would be around 400 hp (on this dyno the way we test). If we apply 14.5 psi from our turbos to the stock 400hp engine, we might get 800 hp.

How much does a LQ9 cost? ›

Base Price LQ9 $13,499 / LY6 $14,199.

How much HP does a stock 6.0 LS have? ›

the stock 6.0L 71cc chambers. Adding the 5.7L heads pushed the compression from 9.5:1 to 9.85:1.
...
Compression Lessons.
CylinderChamberCompression
HeadSizeRatio for LQ4
LQ4 6.0L71cc9.5:1
LS1 5.7L67cc9.8:1
LM7 5.3L61cc10.4:1
1 more row
27 Nov 2017

How big can you bore and stroke a 6.0 LS? ›

LS Engine Bore & Stroke Chart
Engine SizeBoreStroke
5.3L (325 c.i.d.)3.780 in.3.622 in.
5.7L (346 c.i.d.)3.898 in.3.622 in.
6.0L (364 c.i.d.)4.000 in.3.622 in.
6.2L (376 c.i.d.)4.065 in.3.622 in.
2 more rows
5 Jan 2018

How much hp can a stock LQ9 handle? ›

The LQ4 and LQ9 have very strong blocks. They can handle over 1,000 hp.

How much horsepower can you get out of a LS2? ›

The LS2 engine block has a 4.000-inch bore diameter. The cylinders can be bored to 4.030 inches. However, we recommend leaving them as thick as possible when running boost. The block can handle 850 horsepower.

How much hp can a LS motor make? ›

Even in emissions-legal trim, a blown LS1 will pump out over 500 wheel horsepower, with 800 wheel hp available for a serious stroker effort. With turbo motors, the sky is the limit, as 1,000 hp is a common occurrence, with the ability to adjust the power output by turning a simple boost knob.

What is the strongest LS block? ›

Billy sums it up by claiming, “Our BMP LS aluminum block has proven itself to be the strongest of the cast-aluminum blocks available, mainly due to the water jacket area which gives the cylinder walls the strength they need in order not to balloon under extreme cylinder pressures.

How much HP does a 408 LS Stroker have? ›

Equipped with the stock 5.3L truck cam, the 408 stroker produced 449 hp at 5,100 rpm and 522 lb-ft of torque at 3,900 rpm.

Which 6.0 LS has aluminum block? ›

The L76 is a 6.0L, Gen. 4, aluminum small block engine used in both GM cars and trucks from 2007 to 2009.

Which is better LQ4 or LQ9? ›

The ONLY difference between an LQ4 and LQ9 is the piston!

The LQ4 piston is dished where as the LQ9 is a flat-top increasing compression to 10:1, and HP to 345 factory. The LQ9 is a limited production engine and VERY desirable as it is the HO 6.0L and comes with a premium price.

How can you tell the difference between LQ4 and LQ9? ›

The only differences were:
  • The LQ4 came with dished pistons.
  • The LQ9 came with flat top pistons. (This raised the compression ratio, horsepower, and torque.)
  • The LQ9 had injectors with a slightly higher flow rating.
1 Jun 2017

What did the 6.0 LQ9 come in? ›

The LQ9 is a 6.0L Gen. 3 small block engine used in GM trucks between 2002 and 2007.

Whats better LS2 or LS3? ›

In terms of quality and performance, the LS3 is slightly better than the LS2. While the LS2 has a bore of 101.6mm, the LS3 has a bore of 103.25mm. This difference contributes to the change in horsepower of these two engines.

How much horsepower does a 6.0 LS2 have? ›

390-395 hp.

Is the LS1 or LS2 better? ›

The LS2 head flows more air than the LS1 head. In addition, the LS2 engine has a smaller combustion chamber, which leads to an increased compression ratio. With all these mentioned, the LS2 head is better than LS1. The latest model of LS1 is made up of an LS2 and LS6 to increase its torque and horsepower.

How much HP can a stock LS crank handle? ›

Registered. the stock crank can easily handle 800+ hp. There are some using them up to 1000 hp.

What LS motor can handle the most horsepower? ›

Chevrolet Performance - Quite simply the most powerful LS crate engine ever from Chevrolet Performance: The 770 HP LSX454R!

Videos

1. Building A Naturally Aspirated 6.0L LS Iron Block - Engine Power S8, E11
(POWERNATION)
2. NEW SUMMIT RACING Pro LS FORGED PISTONS FOR MY 6.0 ENGINE / TRANS AM LS SWAP!!
(LS Chapa)
3. REBUILDING MY 6.0 LS ENGINE!! / Pro LS FORGED PISTONS
(LS Chapa)
4. Budget LS build // Trip to Summit Racing and unboxing some parts!! Oh and got the 6.0 block back!!
(Billy Mack Builds)
5. SUMMIT RACING LS ACCESSORY DRIVE KIT!
(Goosse Performance)
6. Summit Racing Pro LS Rotating Assemblies
(Summit Racing)

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